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  • casco [CH]


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  • Comprehensive insurance

    a policy promising to pay for damage to your car from a cause other than collision: for example, windshield damage, and loss or damage caused by fire, theft, or vandalism.

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  • Comprehensive Insurance

    Comprehensive insurance reimburses you for damage to your own car from causes other than collision or overturning. The comprehensive portion of your policy pays for loss due to perils like hail, flood, theft, fire, glass breakage, falling objects, missiles, explosions, earthquakes, windstorms, vandalism or malicious mischief, riot or civil commotion, and collision with a bird or an animal - - in other words, just about everything except for collision and normal wear and tear. Comprehensive insurance is a physical damage coverage and also a first-party coverage. First-party coverage pays the policy owner - - that is, you. If you have injured someone else or damaged their property, third-party coverage pays for their losses. [The second party is your insurance company.] When you look at a policy's comprehensive coverage, check for exclusions or limitations. If you have a special audio system installed in your car, for example, you should make sure your policy would cover the cost of the equipment if it were damaged or stolen. It is also important to know if the policy pays for the actual cash value of damaged or stolen property [its current value after depreciation has been subtracted or the full amount required to replace it today.]

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  • Deductible

    A deductible is the amount of a claim the insured must pay. For example, if you get in a fender bender and cause $500 damage to your car, and have a $300 deductible, then the insurance company must pay for the damage over $300 which would be $200. Typically, the higher the deductible, the lower the premium.

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  • excess

    Excess is the term used to describe the amount of money that you must pay before your UK car insurance company will go on to fulfil a claim. Usually you will be asked to pay the first amount of a claim and your insurer will pay the remainder of that bill. Refer to your policy if you are unsure of the minimum excess required. Excess is not automatically included in all aspects of UK car insurance policies and usually relates only accidental damage and theft claims. Young and inexperienced drivers will usually have an automatic excess applied to them because they are considered a higher risk. With some UK car insurance policies you are allowed to request the level of excess. A good way to lower your premiums is to request a higher cut-off point for excess. In this way you can reduce your costs by 15 to 30%. However, although a higher excess level means lower insurance premiums, bear in mind that in case of misfortune you will have to pay out more.

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  • excess

    An amount of money that the policyholder has to pay towards the cost of a claim, for example, the first 50.

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  • quote-part


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  • excess

    the first portion of any claim that the insured agrees to pay

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  • © 2002 Pandraiku Translations